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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just bought a high powered blender to consume my daily suggested amount of veggies and fruits.

What foods should I avoid? I read some information on what to avoid when iodine deficiency is the cause of hypothyroidism, but not too much on Hashimoto's.

What foods do you avoid? Or are there any foods you limit your intake of?

Thank you.
 

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Honestly? I eat everything (which results in more of a weight problem than a thyroid issue!).
 
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Food changes won't do a thing for thyroid disease, autoimmune or otherwise.
 

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You would be better off researching credible medical websites rather than people who call themselves some nebulous title [i.e., "certified nutrition coach"].
 

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The best foods to avoid seems to vary by individual. Some are lucky enough to eat whatever they want without being any the worse for it and others might swear by dropping gluten or wheat or even dairy. Avoiding wheat and gluten has helped alleviate other problems for me without helping my Hashimoto's, but after reading a bit about thyroid disease I did stop eating raw goitrogens; they're all steamed now.

I think it's great that you got a blender and are committed to making healthy dietary choices! Regardless of whether it has a noticeable impact on your thyroid, it's sure to benefit you in other ways.
 

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This was the link posted above:

http://thyroiddietcoach.com/faqs/what-thyroid-foods-to-avoid-in-hypothyroidhashimoto's-disease/

And this is from it:

Goiter is a substance that messes around with your thyroid by making it sluggish and slow in producing the thyroid hormone.

Seriously? This is why internet research has to be approached with caution. Here is the definition of goiter:

goitre or goiter (ˈɡɔɪtə) - n pathol a swelling of the thyroid gland, usually caused by under- or overproduction of hormone by the gland

Now, certain foods are thought to be goitrogens, which are:

goitrogen
noun

any substance (such as thiouracil) that induces the formation of a goiter

There is a list linked to this forum, and the list in the website is similar. YMWV with these, and most of them lose their potency when cooked.

However, there is no particular Hashimotos' "diet". People like to think that they can control everything with diet. Based on the conversation at recent gatherings I have overheard, I am becoming convinced it that special "diets" are the new way to attract attention at group functions where food is involved. Not really. Eat for what your needs are and get on with it.
 

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Amen to that, Lainey!
 

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Most sedentary adults-- with or without autoimmune issues-- would benefit from a better diet. For the most part, we get way more dairy and meat than we 'need' and way less fiber and fruits and veg, as you know. If you want to feel like you're helping your body stay strong, feed it a strong diet. Lots more veggies. A big salad every day for lunch or dinner-- it should be the whole meal. Use seeds like pumpkin seeds or sunflower to tip in a little protein. Make sure to vary the veg and even throw some fruit in there. The first day or two, you might feel hungry but you can add a little cheese or meat. Also, you'll find you start looking forward to the meal.

it doesn't need to be immaculate nutrition in order for you to see benefits. You can take small, easy-to-manage steps, like: eating the salad 1x a day OR throwing out any crackers, chips and cookies OR starting with a really great breakfast, like some eggs and a green smoothie or some oatmeal with berries. I also love Mark Bittman's idea of Vegan before 6-- that you try to be a vegan during the day and eat what you want at dinner. This plan has good consequences on all kinds of levels. How you feel energy-wise, how your immune system reacts, and as an added benefit, it lessens our impact on the planet. Nice.

*I do limit dairy and don't eat gluten. I came to these choices just by watching my own body's reactions. And I should mention-- I don't eat 'substitutes'-- not a lot of gf products or soy. I sometimes use almond milk. I just try to build my diet around plants with some meat or fish a couple of times a week. I don't think my 'recipe' fits everyone. I think it's a fair point that trying to control diet might be an illusory way of trying to control an uncontrollable situation, but I also think, that we all should eat well and I'll always encourage that.
 

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Ksum -- some great advice already in this thread. I'll throw my $0.02 in as a tip. If you really want to go whole-hog, there is a food sensitivity test out there called ALCAT. It's very specialized, expensive (although insurance may cover some of it), and the results could probably be debated. This test really falls into the domain of ND docs, although some MDs order the testing, too.

I'm just as guilty as the next person for harping on gluten. It all comes back to what affects you as an individual. Although I tested negative for Celiac, I tested positive for a nasty case of gluten sensitivity. Removing gluten from my diet has had excellent results. I no longer have constant GI issues, and my brain fog is calmed down quite a bit. It works for me and I've seen the results firsthand. For others, it might be a dairy issue, a peanut allergy, glycemic problem, etc. We are all slightly different.

You can modify your nutrition and eating habits, but don't go completely out of your way to avoid otherwise healthy foods. For example, broccoli & cauliflower are considered "goitrogenic" and can supposedly affect the thyroid. However, if you steam or cook them, this is supposed to mitigate that risk. Not only that, but for men, veggies like broccoli are actually really good for you, and can even help reduce estradiol levels. This, in a roundabout way, can help your testosterone. So... you lean on one thing, it has an affect on another.

If you're interested, look into eating paleo. It is basically how cavemen (and women) ate long ago. It's much less of an emphasis on carbs, grains, and sugars -- and instead healthy fats, proteins, veggies, and fruits. Also, it avoids processed foods and fast foods, which are everywhere in our society. (Heck, Subway just removed a shoe chemical from their breads.) There is a saying out there; "Eat to live, don't live to eat". I think that's a little harsh, but you get the idea. My spin would be to eat healthy, but still enjoy life, too.

Beware of the dietary guidelines put out by government agencies, food manufacturers (both healthy and not), and medical groups. Many times this is motivated by a money trail and/or lobbying. Take everything with a grain of salt (no pun intended), do your own research, and find out what is best for you. Another example: for years people were told that eggs and their associated cholesterol was bad for them. Turns out good cholesterol is a major precursor and framework for hormone production.

With all of that said, I had a homemade cheeseburger for lunch on a gluten-free bun, some Lay's potato chips, and a Coke. :D
 
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