Thyroid Disease Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a little reminder and explanation.

Plasma transport
Most of the thyroid hormone circulating in the blood is bound to transport proteins. Only a very small fraction of the circulating hormone is free (unbound) and biologically active, hence measuring concentrations of free thyroid hormones is of great diagnostic value.

When thyroid hormone is bound, it is not active, so the amount of free T3/T4 is what is important. For this reason, measuring total thyroxine in the blood can be misleading.

More info here..........
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyroid_hormone

And here............
Understanding thyroid lab tests......http://www.amarillomed.com/howto/#Thyroid

And yet even more annoying stuff highly recommended by moi!

TSI (thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin),TPO (antimicrosomal antibodies) TBII (thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin), Thyroglobulin Ab, ANA (antinuclear antibodies),TSH, Free T3, Free T4.

You can look this stuff up here and more.........
http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/conditions/thyroid.html
 

·
Super Gold Veteran
Joined
·
449 Posts
Thank you for this info! I am still learning all this T3 and T4 level stuff. It can be confusing.

I am having a TT next month and I am trying to figure out at what levels I feel good. I have felt bad for so long and didn't realize what was happening to me, so I don't know what levels I feel good at. I have Graves and Hashi's. I am hoping with the thyroid gone it will help alleviate the majority of my Graves' symptoms and then I can just focus on getting the Hashi's under control.

Which level is the one that controls metabolism? I am really concerned about my weight and want to make sure I'm watching that level.

Thanks!

Patti
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
904 Posts
After your TT, levels will be different and so will your symptoms. You will have to start all over again as if day one with your levels. There will be some residue thyroid tissue left for you to deal with as far as levels and symptoms, hopefully won't be that much of a problem for you and thyroid growing back .

TSH comes from the driving force of thyroid or brain of all hormones -- from your pituitary, a little gland in your brain. Your T4 is produced by your thyroid gland, which is in your neck. They are two different things made by two different organs, connected to bring a balance to your metabolism.
Suppressed (0.03) TSH levels more frequently suffered from heart disease, abnormal heartbeat patterns and bone fractures compared to patients whose TSH levels are in the normal range (0.4-4.0).

T3 function is considered to be the regulator of the kidneys.

The main T4 function is to regulate the rhythm of the heart. A person can have a perfect heart yet have heart failure because T4 control is absent. If the thyroid stops functioning or has been surgically removed the adrenals have to act as the hearts backup.

Therefore it is important to keep all three in balance of each other and within Labs reference range to where you feel your best and not to where it is a danger to your being.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MJBK

·
Newbie
Joined
·
3 Posts
Now that they've found hypoechoic nodules on my thyroid thru US, and my TSH was within normal ranges, and I want the further tests done, (eg freeT3 and free T4, saliva test, and the others you recommend, is it best to see and ENT or an Endo? I have a referral from family practitioner to the ENT Sept 12th. I've seen him before for all the mucus, he sent a scope down my throat and said all was clear. Will he order further bloodwork?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Shelly said:
Now that they've found hypoechoic nodules on my thyroid thru US, and my TSH was within normal ranges, and I want the further tests done, (eg freeT3 and free T4, saliva test, and the others you recommend, is it best to see and ENT or an Endo? I have a referral from family practitioner to the ENT Sept 12th. I've seen him before for all the mucus, he sent a scope down my throat and said all was clear. Will he order further bloodwork?
Shelly, I sure don't know about the bloodwork but one would think that he would want more testing. I am glad you are seeing an ENT; they really are informed about this thyroid business.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Greetings, I am new here, and although I've had regular blood tests via Kaiser over the last few years, they only check TSH levels.

My mother had her thyroid removed due to a goiter, and was on Thyroxine for many years.

I have had what I believe are hypo symptoms for years - dry hair, skin, nails, tired, weight gain, cold and heat intolerance, joint pain, etc. Recently (last 2 years maybe) I've had brain fog...and most recently muscle twitches (all over, but mainly lower extremeties) and BAD leg cramps off and on.

The "common" symptoms I've tried to write off as normal aging...but I don't think so anymore, especially not with this new muscle crap! LOL

Kaiser refuses to do anything they don't absolutely have to and said my TSH level is fine, no further testing required. Sick of Kaiser, but cannot change right now.

Can someone send me in the direction of where I can get a complete (and not entirely sure what comprises "complete" here) thyroid blood work up? Will pay for it myself.

THANK YOU IN ADVANCE!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
You are living in California, correct? I was going to suggest HealthCheck USA where you can order your own labs, but I think California has rules around being able to order your own labs.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top