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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I'm glad I found this forum because I've been freaking out and could really use some advice!

I've been fighting a goiter for the last 2 years. My levels have always been within range. I had high RT3 last year but got it under control with an adrenal supplement and felt great.
Then all of a sudden I started having issues again.
My RT3 and thyroid levels are still normal. I tested negative for Hashi antibodies.

I have been taking Selenium and Zinc and all B vitamins for the last year as well.

I finally asked for an Iodine blood test and my serum results were low at 46 mcg/L. Normal range is 52 - 109.

I was very excited to find the issue and bought some Potassium Iodide drops. I started myself out on a low dose .225 mcg 2 days ago. I have more energy and no brain frog which is nice, but my thyroid feels so inflamed.

I feel like I have food stuck in my throat, it's hard to swallow. I also experienced a severe panic attack last night that I still feel.

Shakes, diarrhea, anxiety.

Is this normal detox/die off? Should I stop the iodine? I am so confused because I know it's needed.
I also had to stop taking my Lithium because of this and it's been making the whole situation even harder on my mental state.

I am extremely claustrophobic and cannot stand the tightness in my throat.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, this has been extremely hard and I am very scared of every second and what it will bring.
 

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Lithium is some times used for thyroid cancer patients to improve the uptake radioactive iodine, so I would assume the lithium is increasing uptake of "regular" iodine as well.

Could you post your latest lab results?

Have you had an ultrasound of your thyroid?
 

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Wow!!! You are being challenged here. Not sure it was a good idea to stop the Lithium but ironically, many who have been on Lithium do develop thyroid problems.

From what I understand to be true; once the person has an obvious thyroid condition such as yours, iodine is absolutely contraindicated.

And I would like to strongly urge you to have an ultra-sound of your thyroid. Please promise us you will follow through on the ultra-sound. You may find you do better seeing an ENT about all of this as it sounds like your goiter may be taking the path of least resistance and growing more inward than outward.

Out of curiosity, did you ever think you had a thyroid problem before the lithium came along in your life?

Sending caring hugs,
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies! My issues started after pregnancy (that I noticed). I have always had bad food allergies to eggs and dairy so I am guessing I have been iodine deficient for a while as well. I did have an ultrasound of my thyroid, the right side was 5.3 x .8 x 1.7, the left side was 5.0 x 1.0 x 1.6.

My lab results were

TSH 1.210 0.450-4.500 uIU/mL

T4,Free(Direct) 1.04 0.82-1.77 ng/dL

Reverse T3 13.2 9.2-24.1 ng/dL

Triiodothyronine(T3),Free 2.8 2.0-4.4

Thyroid Peridoxase was <10 Range <35

Iodine serum plasma 46 Range 52 - 109

I was hoping the only issue was iodine deficiency, but after 2 days of the iodine my thyroid feels so swollen. It feels kinda hopeless. Is it normal for the thyroid to swell before it shrinks? I can't stand the choking feeling but I am worried when I see an ENT they will tell me to wait it out or I will have to wait even longer to see an endo.
 

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have you cut gluten, grains, and goitrogenic foods? Please remember your diet can be the most important supplement you can take. Who did the Hashi's test? 20% of Hashi patients, test negative the first time.
 

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I read just yesterday that a sudden influx of Iodine can temporarily stop the thyroid from absorbing Iodine, but I believe it's only for 48 hours, it's due to something known as the Wolff-Chaikoff Effect.

Taking Selenium without Iodine, especially if you have Hashi's, would most probably make you deficient. Now that you're taking Iodine, just ensure you're getting the correct amount of Selenium, which helps protect your thyroid from too much exposure to Iodine. Getting these levels to work in harmony might take some trial and error.

Introduction of something that affects your thyroid, will almost definitely take at least a few days for your body to adjust. I wouldn't give up on it, especially as tests have proven that you're deficient.
 

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You are correct that iodine supplementation must be taken in conjunction with selenium. However, the W-C effect is actually not correctly understood, even by physicians. If you really want to get the facts on the W-C effect, you can read Dr. Abraham's article: http://www.optimox.com/pics/Iodine/IOD-04/IOD_04.html, its called "The Wolff-Chaikoff Effect: Crying Wolf?"

I will quote the heart of the article here, sorry if it gets too scientific:

"In 1948, there was already evidence that the W-C effect, if it was for real in rats (and it was not), did not occur in humans. The Lugol solution and saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) were used extensively in medical practice for patients with asthma. The recommended daily amount was 1,000-2,000 mg.6 This amount was used in patients with asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema for several years. Hypothyroidism and goiter were not common in this group of patients. Those amounts of iodine would have resulted in serum inorganic iodine levels 100 times higher than the serum inorganic iodide levels of 10-6M claimed by Wolff and Chaikoff to result in the W-C effect.3

The most quoted reference for the validation of the W-C effect in humans is not the original 1948 publication, but a review by Wolff in 1969, with the title "Iodide goiter and the pharmacologic effects of excess iodide," published in the American Journal of Medicine.7 This article was obviously addressed to clinicians, and coming from the National Institute of Health gave it credibility. Since it was published in a medical journal, physicians assumed that the W-C effect had been demonstrated in human subjects, as insinuated by Wolff in his review.

The expressions "iodide goiter" and "excess iodide" were used effectively by clinical endocrinologists in their publications to create the iodophobic mentality now prevalent in the medical community.3 For example, what is considered "excess" by endocrinologists represents only 3% of the average daily intake of iodide by 60 million mainland Japanese, a population with a very low incidence of cancer overall, and in particular of the female reproductive organs.2 Just think how healthy our population would be if the average consumption of iodine/iodide by supplementation was in the range consumed by mainland Japanese, i.e., in the range recommended by US physicians in the form of Lugol solution before World War II3"

I am a big big fan of iodine, mainly because of my own personal use with it, and what I have been seeing with my own patients. I have studied it extensively and recommend reading more of Dr. Abraham who is a real pioneer in iodine research.
 
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