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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This video is from a few functional/alternative medicine type folks. Paul Robinson is one of the more experienced people when it comes to using T3. Honestly, there are not many folks who are very experienced in the use of T3...which is why I've always been a bit hesitant to take it myself. Although recently I seem to be doing better...however, I do think I would benefit from taking some. We'll see.

One thing I found very interesting in this conversation (and I have been advocating for over a year) was Paul stating he feels there should be different lab ranges for the type of medication you are on. So if you are on T4 only, you would have a set of ranges. If you are on T4 and T3 you would have a different set. And if you are on T3 only (which is very different), you would have a different set. I have seen this time and time again in facebook groups and it trips people up a lot. Someone will say they are on T4 only, and someone tells them they need to be top of the T3 range. I would say, that's not likely. Also, we should realize where someone feels good in the range (FT4 and FT3) and even TSH can be individualized. However, it's usually a much more narrow range than the labs. My opinion for people on T4 only is TSH .3-2, FT4 mid to 3/4 FT3 mid to 3/4. For people on T4 and T3, usually a lower TSH and sometimes suppressed. But I would still probably say FT4 and FT3 mid to 3/4. But it also should be personalized based on symptoms. I have no clue on T3 only but I would say they probably have FT4 non existent and suppressed TSH. Either way, try to find a good doctor that is familiar with using T3.

I have also heard in the past (even my endo) that lowering T4 meds when adding T3 is usually needed. However, most endos don't believe in going above 10 mcg of T3. That could be a problem for some people who may need a bit more than that. And usually the T3 would be taken twice a day split. So if you are on 10, you'd take one 5 in the morning and another 5 in the afternoon.

I personally think taking T3 only (no T4 at all) should be an absolute last resort and probably only needed for a very small amount of people. And quite frankly you'd need someone like Paul Robinson to help you with dosing it.

See the video here:
 

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I am someone who needs to take T3. Following a TT, my body simply didn’t convert enough from T4 medication alone. I can see it in my early labs when I look back. And while I felt okay if I led a sedentary lifestyle, the moment I tried to add exercise, my body would crash - it was awful.

My personal belief is that thyroid level issues can be very complex, and vary from person to person. One of my own issues, for instance, was low ferritin, along with a few other things. I kept going to doctors, not feeling great, asking for help. One actually told me to EXERCISE MORE. I have had to research and understand my own situation very well, and these boards and the people here who helped me were life-changing for me.

I began to suspect I needed T3 to supplement my T4, but my doctor at that time used mostly TSH as an indicator, and would not prescribe T3 because I had slightly higher blood pressure following the TT than before. I found information online that in some cases, low T3 can raise BP, but she would not listen to anything I learned on “the internet.” I left her and the first thing my new doctor did was put me on T3. I was terrified to take it and split the lowest dose pill into quarters to start! I have info on these boards about my process for starting T3, but the fact of the matter is that I was surviving on T4 only, but didn’t start living again until I also had T3. My blood pressure normalized, my heart rate, and I was eventually able to train for, and run, long distance races and live my life the way I want to, without feeling like I’m on a health roller coaster.

I have had to learn to monitor my own signs and symptoms, as I might need a little more T3 during a cold winter (which has more metabolic demands), during distance run training, or less during summer and/or sedentary activities.

I read something recently related to doctor-recommended diets that I find applicable to different doctors’ treatments for thyroid levels: doctors are all educated, trained, and many of them quite experienced, yet there can be some pretty big differences in treatment plans from doctor to doctor. For my own treatment, my approach has been to find what works for me, what helps me feel okay when living my life, and also happens to land my Free T4 and T3 in the right place.

Mostly, I am posting this in reply to your statement that “T3 only should be an absolute last resort.” I certainly don’t advocate that everyone takes it, but do believe everyone needs to find what works for them, and not automatically rule out T3 as a last resort option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maybe my message was confusing. When I said T3 only, I meant not taking T4 at all and only taking T3 by itself. My language skills are not the best sometimes. Totally agree with everything you said though. People who have no thyroid or one completely destroyed often need some T3 in addition to T4
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah. It's a very specific case where someone would benefit from only T3, and the labs are completely different. I think it's a very last resort and you'd need an expert in it which is going to be very few people in the world. But adding T3 to T4 is much more reasonable.
 
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